Major step forward for Troy’s Run Foundation

Troy Adams, June 2012, just outside of his hometown of Watford. The charity he helped found to raise awareness about brain injuries has just been given charitable status.

Troy Adams, June 2012, just outside of his hometown of Watford. The charity he helped found to raise awareness about brain injuries has just been given charitable status.

Troy’s Run Foundation took a major step forward in its quest to make people aware of brain injuries.

Troy Adams says the foundation has just been given charitable status which he hopes will open the doors to corporate donations.

Adams, a brain injury survivor from Watford, ran across Canada this summer to raise awareness about the effects of brain injury and how it can be prevented. Since he’s returned he has been working with Troy’s Run Foundation, speaking to schools and conferences and trying to make connections with other brain injury groups.

The foundation also held a successful fundraising dinner meant to highlight and celebrate the abilities of people who have suffered an injury. That event raised over $5,000. Adams adds people he has talked to have been surprised Troy’s Run Foundation has been able to raise as much as it has so far, without being a registered charity.

But any efforts to raise money at a corporate level to continue the work have been hampered. “I spoke to a couple of people actually post run…who said they would be more open to us when we acquired charitable status,” he says. “And that makes sense, why would anybody donate without getting a receipt back…corporations for the most part don’t donate unless they get a receipt.

“Now we can get those big corporations behind us.”

Those donations, Adams says, will help the foundation continue to tell the stories of people who are living with brain injuries.

“We started the foundation to give them voices,” he says. “We want to support the groups that are in place and what we know works. There are a couple of organizations in Sarnia-Lambton and London that work…they’ve been very successful but they would be a lot more successful if more people knew about it.”

And Adams says he wants to continue to go out into the community talking about what it’s like to live with a brain injury and bring other survivors out, too.

“We can say, ‘been there, done that and didn’t think it would happen to me.’ That resonates with the kids and helps them understand…When you hear it from the voices of those who have been affected, oh boy, the results are good.”

– Heather Wright

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